Every day in Texas, individuals and businesses engage in transactions that constitute contractual obligations. These may take many forms such as the purchase of a new residential home, an agreement between a homeowner and a contractor for renovation work to be performed or an agreement between two businesses to merge into one combined entity. It is also possible that a party to a contract could be a city agency or even the city itself. Regardless of who the entities are that involved in a contract, it these agreements are important and provide a valuable means of protecting one or both parties later on should a dispute arise. 

One municipality not far from the city of Austin in Texas is today embroiled in a breach of contract dispute with a vendor related to work and terms of an agreement for a solar panel. As reported by pv magazine, the city’s mayor had a strong vision to move the area to energy sources that were completely renewable. This led to the commencement of work on a solar plant. 

The city of Georgetown has alleged in its complaint, initially filed earlier this year, that there are multiple violations of the contract. One of these violations is said to be related to the lack of disclosure about key future performance information related to the plant on the part of the contractor. 

It is not known when the original contract was signed but an amendment was made three years ago. The city is seeking to cancel the contract and to collect $1 million in damaged.