Delayed delivery of goods and services could be a contract violation

| Apr 12, 2021 | Civil Litigation

If you hire another company to render goods and services, and they sign a contract, they may assume that failing to deliver is the only way that they can violate the contract. You already paid them, so they have to fulfill the deal eventually to avoid litigation. 

Total failure to deliver on their end of the bargain is, of course, a clear contract violation. However, this is certainly not the only way that a party can violate their deal. The time at which they perform those services or deliver those products may also be critical. If timeliness is spelled out in your contract, failing to adhere to it is also a violation. 

Why does timing matter so much?

Timing matters in many industries. A restaurant that does not get a shipment of food or drinks on time for a big night may lose out on hundreds of potential sales. A production line that doesn’t get the right parts may grind to a halt and cost a fortune. A music venue that doesn’t have the stage set up on time may have to delay or even cancel the show.

Legally, though, the reason it matters is simply that it is included in the contract. The other party has agreed not just to perform a certain action, but to perform it at or before a specified time. They cannot be substantially late and then hide behind the fact that they eventually made good on the contract to avoid litigation. They have already breached it and caused financial harm to the client.

Are you dealing with a contract violation?

Contract violation cases can become complex and contentious, so be sure you know your options for redress. It’s generally wisest to have a consultation with an attorney about your options as soon as you suspect there is a major problem.